WR140, a star in the constellation Cygnus about 5,600 light-years from Earth, is surrounded by a curved but oddly square ring that appears red in an image shared on Twitter by citizen scientist Judy Schmidt

Mysterious concentric rings surround stars in new James Webb Space Telescope image, confusing astronomers

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope has observed an oddly shaped concentric ring around a distant star that they can’t fully explain — one scientist called the image “crazy.”

WR140, a star in the constellation Cygnus about 5,600 light-years from Earth, is surrounded by curved but oddly square rings, which are red in images shared on Twitter by citizen scientist Judy Schmidt.

‘No, I don’t know what it is. Some kind of spiral nebula around WR140. I’m sure we’ll find out more later,” Schmidt wrote.

“It’s crazy,” said Mark McCollins, ESA’s senior advisor for science and exploration and a member of the James Webb Space Telescope science task force.

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WR140, a star in the constellation Cygnus about 5,600 light-years from Earth, is surrounded by a curved but oddly square ring that appears red in an image shared on Twitter by citizen scientist Judy Schmidt

Mark McCaughrean points out that WR140 is a so-called Wolf-Rayet star, which ejects most of its hydrogen into space and is often surrounded by dust that can be shaped into strange shells by companion stars

Mark McCaughrean points out that WR140 is a so-called Wolf-Rayet star, which ejects most of its hydrogen into space and is often surrounded by dust that can be shaped into strange shells by companion stars

“The six-point blue structure is an artifact because of optical diffraction by the bright star WR140 in this #JWST MIRI image,” he said, referring to the way Webb’s mirrors bend light to create spikes.

‘But the red curvy but boxy thing is real, a series of seashells around the WR140. Actually in space. around a star.

McCaughrean noted that WR140 is a so-called Wolf-Rayet star, which ejects most of its hydrogen into space and is often surrounded by dust that can be shaped into strange shells by its companion star.

These types of stars are known to be very massive—typically 15 times the mass of the Sun—and burn off their core fuel quickly. They exhibit very fast winds, can get very bright, and often create stunning nebulae made of blown gas around them.

'No, I don't know what it is.  Some kind of spiral nebula around WR140.I'm sure we'll find out more later,

‘No, I don’t know what it is. Some kind of spiral nebula around WR140.I’m sure we’ll find out more later,” tweeted citizen scientist Judy Schmidt

“However, this is another area that promises to be revolutionary for JWST, putting its diffraction-limited resolution and extremely high thermal infrared sensitivity to good use to help us understand the final evolutionary stages of living, dying young massive stars. ,”He says

“Yes, those nested ‘squirrel’ rings are real,” Ryan Lau, an astronomer at NOIRLab and principal investigator on the project that obtained the observations, said on Twitter. “Our paper has been submitted, please stay tuned for the full text.”

Schmidt later responded to her own post: “They do look like rings of air, but they’re not. They’re shells of gas and dust.

“The red shells are the real physical structures around Wolf-Rayet stars: they’re famous for this stuff, they’re sculpted by dust ejected from the orbits of binary companion stars. But this is a particularly intriguing one for #JWST A striking example, McCollins said.

Liu and his colleagues published a paper on another Wolf-Rayet star called WR112 in The Astrophysical Journal.

“What the exact geometry of the WR140, with its curved but boxy shell, is not immediately obvious to me why there is a discrete, separate shell instead of a helix…well, I believe Ryan and His colleagues were working at that time,” McCawlin later added.

“However, this is another area that promises to be revolutionary for JWST, putting its diffraction-limited resolution and extremely high thermal infrared sensitivity to good use to help us understand the final evolutionary stages of living, dying young massive stars. ,” he said, including a photo of Elvis and his tweet.

This latest image was taken shortly after the release of the first photo of an exoplanet 385 light-years from Earth.

Using its Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) and Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI), the telescope can block surrounding starlight to take epic images of the exoplanet HIP 65426.

In 2017, the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope first discovered alien worlds in Chile, but the long wavelengths are blocked by Earth’s atmosphere.

This exoplanet is only 15 to 20 million years old, much younger than our 4.5 billion-year-old Earth.

“But Webb’s first capture of exoplanets already hints at the possibility of studying distant worlds in the future,” NASA shared in a statement.

“What the exact geometry of the WR140, with its curved but boxy shell, is not immediately obvious to me why there is a discrete, separate shell instead of a helix…well, I believe Ryan and His colleagues are working for now,” McCawlin later added.Above: James Webb Space Telescope image from the Stephen Quartet

Liu and his colleagues published a paper on another Wolf-Rayet star called WR112 in The Astrophysical Journal.Above: Image of the Southern Ring Nebula from the James Webb Space Telescope

Liu and his colleagues published a paper on another Wolf-Rayet star called WR112 in The Astrophysical Journal.Above: Image of the Southern Ring Nebula from the James Webb Space Telescope

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