This shows the vitamin capsule

Vitamin D supplementation appears to ease depression symptoms in adults

To summarize: Findings from an extensive meta-analysis suggest that vitamin D supplementation may help relieve symptoms of depression.

resource: University of Eastern Finland

An extensive meta-analysis suggests that vitamin D supplementation reduces depressive symptoms in adults with depression. The meta-analysis was conducted by an international team of researchers and included dozens of studies from around the world.

Depressive symptoms contribute to a significant disease burden worldwide. Current treatment effects of antidepressants are often insufficient, which is why further relief of depressive symptoms is sought, such as from nutritional research.

Vitamin D is thought to regulate central nervous system function, and central nervous system dysfunction is associated with depression. In addition, cross-sectional studies observed an association between depressive symptoms and vitamin D deficiency.

However, previous meta-analyses on the effects of vitamin D supplementation on depression have been inconclusive. In a meta-analysis, the results of several different studies are combined and statistically analyzed.

The new meta-analysis on the relationship between vitamin D supplementation and depression is the largest meta-analysis published to date and includes results from 41 studies from around the world.

These studies investigated the efficacy of vitamin D in reducing depressive symptoms in adults through randomized placebo-controlled trials in different populations.

The studies included studies in people with depression, the general population, and people with different medical conditions.

Vitamin D is thought to regulate central nervous system function, and central nervous system dysfunction is associated with depression.Image is in the public domain

The results of the meta-analysis showed that vitamin D supplementation was more effective than placebo in alleviating depressive symptoms in people with depression. There is significant variation in the dose of vitamin D used, but typically vitamin D supplements are 50-100 micrograms per day.

“Despite the broad scope of this meta-analysis, the certainty of the evidence remains low due to the heterogeneity of the population studied and the risk of bias associated with the large number of studies,” said Tuomas Mikola, PhD researcher and lead author of the University of Eastern Finland Clinical Medicine Study said. The meta-analysis was part of Dr. Mikola. paper.

“These findings will encourage new high-level clinical trials in people with depression to learn more about the possible role of vitamin D supplementation in the treatment of depression,” concluded Mikola.

The meta-analysis was published in Food Science and Nutrition Reviews And international collaborations between Finnish, Australian and American researchers.

News about this depression and vitamin D research

author: News office
resource: University of Eastern Finland
touch: Press Office – University of Eastern Finland
picture: Image is in the public domain

Original research: closed access.
“Effect of vitamin D supplementation on depressive symptoms in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials,” by Tuomas Mikola et al. Food Science and Nutrition Reviews


Abstract

see also

This shows a sibling walking down a path

The effect of vitamin D supplementation on depressive symptoms in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Neurosteroidal and immunological effects of vitamin D may modulate the physiology associated with depression. Meta-analyses investigating the effect of vitamin D on depression have been inconsistent.

This meta-analysis investigated the efficacy of vitamin D in reducing depressive symptoms in adults in randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs).

Includes general and clinical populations, as well as studies of patients with systemic disease. Phototherapy, co-supplementation (except calcium), and bipolar disorder were excluded.

Databases Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify relevant English-language articles published before April 2022. Studies were assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool (RoB 2) and GRADE. Forty-one randomized controlled trials (n= 53,235) were included. Analyses based on random effects models were performed using comprehensive meta-analysis software.

Results of the main outcome (n= 53,235) revealed a positive effect of vitamin D on depressive symptoms (Hedges’ G= -0.317, 95% confidence interval [−0.405, −0.230], p< 0.001, i2 = 88.16%; rating: very low certainty). In most studies, RoB assessments were worrisome. Despite high heterogeneity, vitamin D supplementation ≥ 2,000 IU/day appeared to reduce depressive symptoms.

Future research should investigate the possible benefits of adding vitamin D to standard care in clinical depression.

PROSPERO registration number: CRD42020149760. Funding: Finnish Medical Foundation, grant 4120 and Juho Vainio Foundation, grant 202100353.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.